Tag Archives: typing skills

Does this sound like a conversation around your home?

                    “Why does it take him so long to complete his work?”                                “She’s not writing in complete sentences.”             “Our kids seem to get so frustrated with simple assignments.”   Listen to what parents are saying after teaching their children to type using Keyboard Classroom. “Within 4 months she had finished the typing program and was now a proficient typist! Now when she has to write papers or use the computer, her fingers fly through the keys   while keeping up with her thoughts!” “A child who struggles with handwriting will greatly benefit from having keyboarding     skills. The new must-have skill is typing. “ “For my son, it provided a … Read More

It’s time to place an effective typing curriculum near the top of the list.

I just read an article in The Hartford Courant about “allowing students to bring to school any online device they had- Smartphone, tablet or laptop- for use in class as teachers saw fit.”  Educators are realizing that it makes no sense to stop students from using the digital tools they use outside of school.” I totally agree with this but I do have one concern.  Why would you hand a student a laptop and NOT teach them how to touch type beforehand?  You don’t drive a car until you take driver’s ed….you don’t jump into a pool before you learn to swim….you don’t give a child a book without teaching them how to read first.  My point is that there are steps to learning how to do something.  You don’t start at step 10 and work backwards!  You start at … Read More

Research Shows the Power of Keyboarding for Students

There are a number of research documents written regarding the power of keyboarding as a literacy skill. This sums up what nearly all researchers agree on. Traditionally, keyboarding was taught at the high school level to students who had never before used a keyboard. Now, with computers both at home and in our elementary schools, we find that very young students are being exposed to the computer keyboard. One study focusing on computer use in the school system estimated that students would spend more than 400 hours on computers before they reached the ninth grade (Kidney, 1985). As the keyboard continues to be the primary device for inputting data into computers, the purpose in presenting these guidelines are three-fold: • to familiarize young students with keyboarding skills. • to give elementary students the opportunity to learn and develop keyboarding skills … Read More

How Computers Change the Writing Process

Recently, while perusing the internet, I found this interesting article about how computers changed the writing process for people with learning disabilities. It was written by Richard Wanderman.  I was taken back by how much Richard and I agreed with this concept.  As an educator who has taught students how to type for the past 16 years, it was refreshing to see this concept finally taking center stage! Richard was an adult with learning disabilities when he discovered how important it was to work on a computer to write instead of using the pencil and paper mode.  As he says, “In fact, if I didn’t write with a computer I wouldn’t be able to share this article with you because I wouldn’t be able to record, work with, and share my ideas and I wouldn’t know from personal experience how … Read More

Handwriting vs. Keyboarding–from a Student’s Perspective

Jacqui Murray has been teaching K-8 technology for 15 years. Every year, she has her 4th grade students compare handwriting speed to keyboarding speed.  Here are some of the results from the students who thought keyboarding was more useful than handwriting. Can lose your paper pencils break, erasers disappear, points get dull. Then, I have to take time to get a replacement. Never happens with a keyboard. hand never gets tired eyes must constantly move from sheet to pencil. Once I’ve memorized the keys, I don’t have to do that anymore you can only get so fast at handwriting–say, 45 wpm. Most students will exceed that speed with typing. Lots of people type 65 wpm. I type 120 (well, not anymore because of my arthritis). In the big picture, the average student will never handwrite as fast as keyboard Erasing … Read More

The Reason your Student is NOW Smiling!

As parents it’s so hard to peek into a room and see your child struggling with their homework!  We know something has to be done to relieve some of this pressure on our child but where do we turn? My first suggestion would be to look for an ‘intervention’  as soon as possible!  To be clear, an Intervention is a planned set of procedures that are aimed at teaching a specific skill to a student.  It’s more than a single lesson and less than an entire curriculum. Deciding what intervention option to use should not be made lightly. It will take much contemplation on what is the best for your child, what your finances will allow, and if you are willing to carry through with any of these choices. As a parent I did two things that made a big … Read More

Out with the Old… In with the New!

“If you want to succeed you should strike out on new paths, rather than travel the worn paths of accepted success.” John D. Rockefeller Doesn’t that say it all!  My new mission is to get schools to throw out their ‘old school mentality’ and embrace the new ways of doing things.  Students have a different mentality towards learning because of the way they were brought up with technology.  Their brains work faster, their learning style is quicker and they expect to multitask as they are learning. As Alan Cohen says: “It takes a lot of courage to release the familiar and seemingly secure, to embrace the new. But there is no real security in what is no longer meaningful. There is more security in the adventurous and exciting, for in movement there is life, and in change there is power.” … Read More

Preventing the Summer Slide

NOW is the time to think about your summertime plans!  It can be as easy as hitting the town pool everyday, going to visit the grandparents, or going hunting for pollywogs and turtles with the neighborhood kids. Whatever your plans are, there is always something waiting for many children each summer and their parents don’t even know it’s out there. It’s called the “summer slide,” and it describes what happens when young minds sit idle for three months. According to the authors of a report from the National Summer Learning Association: “A conservative estimate of lost instructional time is approximately two months or roughly 22 percent of the school year…. It’s common for teachers to spend at least a month re-teaching material that students have forgotten over the summer. That month of re-teaching eliminates a month that could have been … Read More

Special Education Students

While channel surfing last night my husband and I came upon a HBO Documentary Special.  There were 4 mini programs on learning disabilities and special education. The first program was on ADD and ADHD and they interviewed children who had it.  The kids spoke honestly about their symptoms, how it affected them and what they needed to do to ‘look and act like normal kids’.  The first thing we noticed was how well they understood their disability.  The second thing we noticed is that each kid had trouble with their communication skills.  Their thoughts ran through their heads so fast that they had a hard time translating them in word or on paper.   When speaking in class the teachers didn’t have the patience to allow them to find the words that they were trying to get out.  The other students … Read More

Waiting for that first Teacher Conference

I can hear it now….why isn’t ‘Johnny’ progressing in his work?  Why can’t he take good notes?  Why can’t he keep up in class? There are many answers for those questions.  I can help in the note-taking aspect of learning.  As the Director of an educational program at the Ben Bronz Academy in Ct. I worked with many students who had a hard time manipulating a pencil/pen.  We introduced them to Keyboard Classroom, a typing program that was developed at the school by the teachers.  The results have been tremendous. As we now know, keyboarding is a life-long skill.  It has evolved from a “transcription” typing skill to a “generative” typing skill involving composing original thought at the keyboard.  Student writing develops faster through word processing because it facilitates the review and revision learning process.  Efficient keyboarding skills allow students … Read More