Tag Archives: school curriculum

It’s time to place an effective typing curriculum near the top of the list.

I just read an article in The Hartford Courant about “allowing students to bring to school any online device they had- Smartphone, tablet or laptop- for use in class as teachers saw fit.”  Educators are realizing that it makes no sense to stop students from using the digital tools they use outside of school.” I totally agree with this but I do have one concern.  Why would you hand a student a laptop and NOT teach them how to touch type beforehand?  You don’t drive a car until you take driver’s ed….you don’t jump into a pool before you learn to swim….you don’t give a child a book without teaching them how to read first.  My point is that there are steps to learning how to do something.  You don’t start at step 10 and work backwards!  You start at … Read More

How Computers Change the Writing Process

Recently, while perusing the internet, I found this interesting article about how computers changed the writing process for people with learning disabilities. It was written by Richard Wanderman.  I was taken back by how much Richard and I agreed with this concept.  As an educator who has taught students how to type for the past 16 years, it was refreshing to see this concept finally taking center stage! Richard was an adult with learning disabilities when he discovered how important it was to work on a computer to write instead of using the pencil and paper mode.  As he says, “In fact, if I didn’t write with a computer I wouldn’t be able to share this article with you because I wouldn’t be able to record, work with, and share my ideas and I wouldn’t know from personal experience how … Read More

Handwriting vs. Keyboarding–from a Student’s Perspective

Jacqui Murray has been teaching K-8 technology for 15 years. Every year, she has her 4th grade students compare handwriting speed to keyboarding speed.  Here are some of the results from the students who thought keyboarding was more useful than handwriting. Can lose your paper pencils break, erasers disappear, points get dull. Then, I have to take time to get a replacement. Never happens with a keyboard. hand never gets tired eyes must constantly move from sheet to pencil. Once I’ve memorized the keys, I don’t have to do that anymore you can only get so fast at handwriting–say, 45 wpm. Most students will exceed that speed with typing. Lots of people type 65 wpm. I type 120 (well, not anymore because of my arthritis). In the big picture, the average student will never handwrite as fast as keyboard Erasing … Read More

I found my Passion!

I have been a very happy educator for the past 23 years….There is nothing better than to see a student overcome an obstacle and see themselves as confident and successful. As Mickey Rooney says, “You always pass failure on the way to success.” My job is to be sure I give my students enough skills to use when fighting for success.  There will be plenty of roadblocks in their lives.  The secret is to be able to jump over the obstacles and keep yourself in a forward motion. As Sir Winston Churchill reminds us, “Success is the ability to go from one failure to another with no loss of enthusiasm.” So now I HAVE come upon a personal roadblock.  I have noticed that one skill is missing from their curriculum….learning how to touch-type.  Now you may think this is a … Read More

You Need to Type to Tell the Computer What You Want

There is nothing magical about Touch-Typing.  Here’s how it works. Instead of watching the keyboard as you type, you watch the screen, and you type without looking.  You simply learn the position of each key on the keyboard, and through practice your fingers develop muscle memory and NOW you will always know where the keys are …without looking! Once the process becomes automatic you only have to think of a word for it to appear on the screen. I find it a very enjoyable way to work, because it’s less tiring, and you don’t have to keep shifting your eyes from keyboard to screen. Here are some amazing benefits to typing: Because you’re watching the screen as you type, you can instantly spot any typing errors and correct them straightaway. Touch-typing helps free your mind from the mechanics of what you’re … Read More

Creativity in the Classroom

I am still focusing on the need to bring creativity to the classroom.  I have read many articles, blogs and comments from teachers, parents and students about HOW to do this. One of my favorite articles was from Sir Ken Robinson.  The point of Robinson’s talk is that the current education system is designed to squander creativity . Children are steered away from unusual instincts toward the traditional skills that will lead to secure jobs.  He said “Our education system has mined our minds in the way that we strip-mine the earth-for a particular commodity. And for the future, it won’t serve us. We have to rethink the fundamental principles on which we’re educating our children.  When children enter school, Robinson argues, they do so without a fear of being wrong. He tells the story of a quiet girl drawing … Read More

Attention Schools:

When we launched Keyboard Classroom nearly four years ago, it was after testing the product in a classroom environment for over a decade.  Parents of children with and without learning disabilities embraced it as a way to complement what their children were doing in school.  Now it appears, educators have caught the KC bug as well. A three year old school in North Carolina recently created a new typing curriculum completely around Keyboard Classroom.  The school, built on a philosophy of inclusion, brings children with special needs, children with average abilities, and children who are academically gifted, together in a friendly and charitable environment. One of the school’s teachers wrote to us.  “I was drawn to your program because of its specialization for helping children with special needs.  Besides autism, we also have children with ADD and serious handwriting difficulties.  There are other … Read More